erkan

#journalism agenda: Google on an international framework for digital evidence…Facebook wants to embrace great journalism [despite its algorithms…

In Uncategorized on April 21, 2017 at 11:26

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Facebook’s in the midst of a serious campaign to convince everyone how much it cares about journalism.

Even at F8, the company’s giant developer conference taking place this week, it’s saucing on the charm.

An international framework for digital evidence

Today, we’re releasing the latest version of our Transparency Report regarding government requests for user data. In the second half of 2016, we received over 45,000 government requests for user data worldwide. This is the most government requests we’ve received for user data in a six-month period since we released our first transparency report in 2010.

Google is taking a counterintuitive approach to countering adblocking: building an adblocking feature of its own.

The Wall Street Journal reported on Wednesday night that Google is considering bringing an adblocking feature to the desktop and mobile versions of its Chrome web browser. The feature, which could be turned on by default, would block ads that don’t meet the standards set by the Coalition for Better Ads (of which Google and Facebook, among others, are both members and pay to fund), such as pop-ups, prestitials, and auto-play videos that have sound.

After a short trip to China where he met with business and government leaders, Financial Times editor Lionel Barber was faced with a conundrum that many journalists know well.

Barber co-wrote a number of stories for the FT based on the interviews he conducted, but he still had interesting material pertaining to mergers and acquisitions that he couldn’t quite fit into any of his other pieces.

This free iOS app allows mobile journalists to create short videos with text, stickers and music
Take these tips on board to ensure a smoother 360-degree production process

Fake news is affecting people’s trust in the news they read on Facebook

A lot of people get their news on Facebook — but a lot of people don’t believe the news they read on Facebook.

That’s according to a new survey from BuzzFeed and Ipsos Public Affairs, who quizzed 3,000 American adults on their views about Facebook and the news. The results were not pretty. Over half of those who took the survey said they trust the news they read on Facebook “only a little” or “not at all.”

A few things to watch from this weekend’s International Journalism Festival in Perugia

If you weren’t in Italy the past few days, here are a few sessions to watch from the International Journalism Festival, which took place April 5–9 in Perugia. Videos of all the sessions are here, and the hashtag is here.

Fake news was, not surprisingly, a big topic; here’s Facebook’s Aine Kerr, journalist Mark Little, Poynter’s Alexios Mantzarlis, BuzzFeed’s Craig Silverman, and First Draft News’s Claire Wardle:

Members of Congress are back in their districts this week for the start of a two-week recess, and as the senators and representatives hold town halls and meet constituents, The Washington Post is asking its readers to help its coverage by sharing video and audio clips from meetings they attend.

“We’ll take suggestions for any topic that piques your interest, though we’re especially interested in health care, immigration, actions taken by President Trump’s administration, and the federal budget,” Post Fact Checker reporter Michelle Ye Hee Lee wrote in a letter to readers on the Post’s website.

By the time White House press secretary Sean Spicer called ProPublica a “left-wing blog” in an attempt to delegitimize its reporting on changes to Trump’s trust, ProPublica was ready.

“Since we’re in the actually in the biz of facts, we figured we’d respond w/ a few…” ProPublica began on Twitter on April 3, launching into a 16-tweet tweetstorm filled with facts on how it’s held people in power accountable. It ended with:

‘We define our stories as things that we can’t do in another context’
Check out this guide for a list of apps, tools and hardware to try out when getting your mojo on

Bulgaria, “quasi-media” on the rise

Media on government payroll and distrust by citizens make Bulgaria a symbol of deteriorating freedom of expression in Europe

Vía Erkan’s Field Diary http://ift.tt/2pKed69

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