erkan

Anthropology roundup: A manifesto: “Foundations of an Anarchist Archaeology”

In Uncategorized on November 2, 2016 at 14:20

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Foundations of an Anarchist Archaeology: A Community Manifesto

This entry is part 18 of 18 in the Decolonizing Anthropology series.

By The Black Trowel Collective

An anarchist archaeology embraces considerations of social inequity as a critique of authoritarian forms of power and as a rubric for enabling egalitarian and equitable relationships.

 

Political Temporalities: 2016 U.S. Election

U.S. presidential elections are extraordinary moments—ruptures in everyday time, full of transformative promise. Maybe. More than two decades ago, in her seminal essay on time, Nancy D. Munn wrote: “the topic of time frequently fragments into all the other dimensions and topics anthropologists deal with in the social world.” So, in the cacophonous 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, how do we perceive time and why might that matter?

We asked Annual Meeting workshop organizers to give our blog readers a sneak peek at the events they have planned for AAA 2016. This post was submitted by Kurt Dongoske, Director of  the Zuni Heritage and Historic Preservation Office/Principal Investigator for Zuni Cultural Resource Enterprise. 

Overview
The Society for Linguistic Anthropology Committee on Language & Social Justice (LSJ) will be organizing social media artifacts (tweets, Instagram posts, etc.) into a curated Storify (https://storify.com/) resulting from several events (panels, roundtables, meetings) during the AAA 2016 conference in Minneapolis[1].

Here’s why you should care about the scrapping of A-level anthropology
The Conversation UK
At first the voices were predictable. With archaeology, art history and anthropology A-levels set to be scrapped, TV presenter Tony Robinson condemned this “barbaric act”. The Council for British Archaeology warned of a national shortage of archaeologists

Besteman to Present Paper at American AnthropologicalAssociation Meeting
Colby College
Bartlett Professor of Anthropology Catherine Besteman will present a paper titled “Refugee Matters and the AnthropologicalGaze” at the 115th annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association. Besteman’s paper will be part of session called .
This entry is part 17 of 18 in the Decolonizing Anthropology series.

By Tiatoshi Jamir

I was born on a land declared an ‘Excluded Area’: a previously colonized region. A geographic landmass formerly carved out of Assam: lodged between Myanmar to its east, Manipur to its south, bounded by the plains of Assam to the west and snow clad mountains of the sub-Himalayan region of Arunachal Pradesh to the north. Now tagged for tourism purposes as ‘The Land of Festivals,’ it is the very same homeland where Naga ancestors were once branded ‘wild’, ‘savage’, ‘primitive’ ‘uncivilized’ ‘barbaric’ and ‘head hunters’ by the colonial powers. This colonial stereotype of the Nagas continues and is reiterated in the neighboring states and Mainland India. A case in point is Manpreet Singh’s article The Soul Hunters of Central Asia (2006) published in Christianity Today that describes the Naga homeland as “once notorious worldwide for its savagery”,  now “the most Baptist state in the world.”

Vía Erkan’s Field Diary http://ift.tt/2fuRVVg

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